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Margaret Tebbit died at the age of 86: she survived to IRA bomb

The announce of her husband: the lady had been suffering from Lewy Body Dementia.

Margaret Tebbit died at the age of 86

Lady Margaret Tebbit, wife of ex-Conservative minister Norman Tebbit, died at the age of 86.

Margaret Tebbit died: the announce

On Saturday morning, Margaret died at the couple’s home in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk.

The lady had been suffering from Lewy Body Dementia. Infact, her husband Norman, announcing her death said: “She’d been ill for a very long time with wretched Lewy body dementia. She was much loved and will be much missed.”

Margaret was also best known because she survived to IRA’s October 1984 bombing in Brighton.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson described Lady Tebbit as “a brave woman who showed enormous fortitude in her suffering after the 1984 Brighton bombing”. He also added in a statement on Twitter: “My thoughts are with Norman and their family at this difficult time”.

The IRA’s bombing in 1984

In 1984, the Irish Republican Army (IRA) was a paramilitary organisation. They fought for Northern Ireland to be a part of the Republic of Ireland. The bomb had been planted in the hotel by Patrick Magee.

The target of the IRA’s Brighton bomb was Margaret Thatcher, who was prime minister at the time. She survived the blast but five people were killed and many more injured. Trade Secretary Lord Tebbit and his wife were among the latter ones. The couple were lying in bed when their ceiling collapsed, leaving Lady Tebbit with spinal injuries.

Only a year later, Lady Tebbit herself spoke of the attack for the first time. She said: “I don’t blame people, I don’t completely forget or forgive, but one has to completely look forward”.

On the other hand, Lord Tebbit previously said there was “no possibility of any forgiveness” for the people behind the bombing. He added: “One can hope that there’s a particularly hot corner of hell reserved for them and they can repent in their own time there.”

Lady Tebbit was born in 1934. She was vice president of the spinal cord injury charity Aspirefor 20 years. The organisation’s chief executive Brian Carlin said she would be “deeply missed”, describing her as “an incredible ambassador and role model for people with spinal cord injuries”.

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