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Due to “coronavirus pressure”, Flybe collapses

Travel fears over the viruses make the airline company has fragile finances and make passengers stuck at airports home and abroad.

flybe coronavirus
flybe coronavirus

Flybe, the budget airlines in Europe has left thousands people stay in nowhere over coronavirus. Travel fears over the viruses make the airline company has fragile finances and make passengers stuck at airports home and abroad. The worst is 2,300 workers of Flybe are jobless.

Coronavirus, Flybe collapses

Flybe had tried to broker rescue load with government but a deal could not be done in time. In fact, Flybe avoided since January but has continued to lose money. Coronavirus fears made the situation more difficult fir the budget airline.

It because the demand for flight is drop.

Flye-Be CEO, Mark Anderson wrote: “It’s with enormous sadness and a deep feeling of sorrow that I share the upsetting news that Flybe is shortly being put into administration. “Despite every effort, we now have no alternative — having failed to find a feasible solution to allow us to keep trading. “Although I have only had the honour of being your CEO for eight months, its been an incredible privilege to lead such an amazing team of people and the FlyBe family.”

Late last night, passengers reported being turned away from airports and informed them that would be no more flights. From this case we know that more than 2,000 jobs and the future of a number of regional airports will be at risk. When Monarch Airline and Thomas Cook collapse before, The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) was ordered to launch a major repatriation operation to fly them home by the Department for Transport.

But the CAA has now confirmed the government would not order a publicy-funded widespread repatriation of stranded passengers. Because of this, many passengers stranded in wrong city with no information of getting home. Then government has told rail and bus firms to accept Flybe tickets and easyJet has offered those stuck at airports free flights home. While RyanAir has launched rescue fares starting from £19.99 on five routes to accommodate those affected

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