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50,000 covid deaths ‘should and could have been avoided’, BMA says

Top doctors say coronavirus deaths passing 50,000 is a sign of UK Government's lack of preparation.

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The British Medical Association (BMA) has commented on the tragic figures showing more than 50,000 covid deaths in the UK within just 28 days of testing positive. According to the BMA, the figure represents a lack of organisation from the Government and if it won’t learn the lesson from the first wave, it will fail again.

‘A figure that could have been avoided’

England registered 50,365 deaths for covid within 28 days of testing positive and according to top doctors this figure is unacceptable and a sign of Government’s lack of preparation. The British Medical Association urges UK Government to learn the lesson and act differently, in order to protect the public from this second wave of the pandemic.

“It’s vital that the Government learns the lessons” commented BMA council chair Chaand Nagpaul during an interview where he spoke up on behalf of the members of the Association about the news that UK death toll had exceeded 50,000.“A figure that could and should have been avoided” BMA says, asking the Government to learn the lesson to protect lives and avoid the mistakes of the first wave of coronavirus.

The UK has in fact become the first country in Europe to pass the 50,000 covid deaths and, according to Dr Nagpaul “this is a point that should never have been reached. He continued: “In March, Professor Steve Powis said that if the public adhered to the nationwide lockdown the total toll could be kept below 20,000 Today’s figure is a terrible indictment of poor preparation, poor organisation by the Government, insufficient infection control measures, coupled with late and often confusing messaging for the public… As we look towards the hope of a vaccine, it’s vital that lessons are learned from the last nine months to ensure that nothing on this scale ever happens again.”

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