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Omnia mea Cattery: Abyssinian kittens for sale

Abyssinian kittens, presented in Omnia Mea, are elegant medium-sized cats with strong, lithe bodies and long, slender legs.

Abyssinian kittens
Abyssinian kittens

Have you decided to buy an Abyssinian kitten? You have made the right choice. Abyssinian kittens, presented in Omnia Mea cattery https://omniameacattery.com/ are simply
unique! Abyssinian cats are elegant medium-sized cats with strong, lithe bodies and long, slender legs. They have round, wedge-shaped heads with distinctive small tufts on the tips of ears and large almond-shaped eyes.

The short, close-lying coat of an Abyssinian cat, has a distinctive ‘ticked’ look caused by bands of colour on each hair. The most well know colour is ‘ruddy’ but there are several others. The Abyssinian is a medium-sized cat with a long body and nicely developed muscles. She is an active cat that loves to jump and play. The Abyssinian is moderate looking in all aspects with smooth planes on her head. She has a gentle dip in the triangular head. Her rather large ears sit tilted forward on her head giving her an alert, aware look about her as if she is always paying attention to everything that is going on around her. Her eyes, which look large in her face, show the alertness and intelligence inherent in the breed.

The coat on the Abyssinian is short and has tufts of hair in her ears. The coloring of the Abyssinian is very special. The majority of the fur has bands of color on each individual hair with the coat looking darker along the spine line. The color on her body softens and lightens under the neck and the underside of the cat and the insides of her legs.

Personality

The Abyssinian cat is quiet, intelligent and curious and is said to enjoy human company and become attached to its family. It enjoys space and activity, is a good climber, and will appreciate a
garden full of trees and high places. Abyssinian cats are playful but tempered with some sense so are not too wreckless!

Health

Abyssinian cats can suffer from an inherited disease called pyruvate kinase deficiency that can cause anaemia. A reliable test is available for this and prospective owners should ask breeders if
their cats have been tested and are clear of the problem. An eye problem, called progressive retinal atrophy, which causes progressive blindness has been indentified in some countries so it is
worth asking the breeder about this as well.

Nutrition

Every cat is unique and each has their own particular likes, dislikes, and needs when it comes to food. However, cats are carnivores and every cat must obtain 41 different and specific nutrients from their food. The proportion of these nutrients will vary depending on age, lifestyle and overall health, so it’s not surprising that a growing, energetic kitten needs a different balance of nutrients in her diet than a less active senior cat. Other considerations to bear in mind are feeding the right quantity of food to maintain ‘ideal body condition’ in accordance with feeding guidelines and catering to individual preference regarding wet or dry food recipes.

History

While the Abyssinian cat is considered to be the breed that can trace her roots directly to the Nile Valley, she was actually developed in Great Britain. In the 1860s, a cat was brought to Britain by Lord Robert Napier following a military expedition to Abyssinia. This cat was named Zulu and she was the foundation of the beautiful breed known today as the Abyssinian. The unique ticking pattern on the co,at of the Abyssinian reminded people of the camouflage pattern on the coat of the wild rabbit. This characteristic was so delightful that Zulu was bred to random-bred cats that carried a similar look to their coat and the Abyssinian breed was created.

The breed itself was extremely popular and Abyssinian cats were soon being bred throughout Europe and in the United States and Canada. This popularity proved to be the salvation of the breed as the two world wars almost decimated the breed in Europe. New Abyssinians were imported and the breed continued. In the late 1960s, when the feline leukemia virus almost destroyed the breed once again in Britain, more Abyssinians were brought into Britain to reestablish the breed again.

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